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de Havilland D.H. 82 Tiger Moth in Detail

Part 2 - Wings and Bits

n text by Kai-Mikael Jää-Aro
n photos by Martin Waligorski



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A close-up of the wingstruts, note the narrow attachment points to the wings and the spreader bar for the wires (somewhat difficult to distinguish in this picture, though). In the background we can also see a square shape on top of the rear fuselage. This is probably a gas detection marking, these were common on second-line aircraft in 1940–42 – exposure to poison gas is supposed to turn the surface black. Note that the surface is a very pale green rather than pure white.

 




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Landing gear. Note the DH logo on the wheel hub.

 




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Another characteristic feature of the Tiger Moth: the fuel tank in corrugated metal in the midwing. The wings could be folded backwards from this point.
 

 




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The Tiger Moth has Handley Page automatic leading edge slats, improving flying characteristics. Note also the pitot tube, protected by a sheath. (Remove before flight.)
 

 




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A somewhat dark picture of the tail end. We see the elevator cables coming out of the fuselage below the rudder cables. Note the separation between tail fin and stabilizer. The "strake" in front of the stabilizer improves stalling characteristics, I have been told.
 

 

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