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Mikoyan & Gurevich Mig-19 in Detail
Airframe details

n by Robert Blaschke


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Apologies for the lack of initial overall view of the aircraft, but at the time of the photo session I was interested exclusively in details! So we jump straight into close-ups: this is lower part of the very nose of the aircraft with the tip of the 30mm cannon barrel visible to the right. The nose probe is tilted up on its swiveling mount, possibly a feature to prevent  damage to the probe during ground handling.
 

Photo: Robert Blaschke

 

The nose intake configuration of Mig-19 followed the tried but simple fixed-flow solution of Mig-15/17 series with the massive split-plate inside the blunt nose. A peek into the port nose intake reveals some streamlined bracing inside.

Photo: Robert Blaschke

 


I managed to climb up on the wing to take this picture of the canopy. Note the tight fit of its  moveable part. The ejection seat is barely visible inside.
 

Photo: Robert Blaschke

 


No, this is not an early version of head-up display, but rather a classic reflector gunsight. 
The Mig-19 was primarily designed as a dogfighter!
 
An interesting technology detail is the curious mixture of Philips-type and  traditional screws used in the airframe construction, as visible on the canopy rim.
  

Photo: Robert Blaschke

 


Not a best quality photo, this one shows detail of  the rear cockpit decking behind the pilot's seat.
 

Photo: Robert Blaschke

 


Contrary to the usual Soviet preference of single-engine configuration for fighter aircraft, the Mig-19 needed two engines to achieve the performance requirements. These were the Tumansky RD-9 turbojets, each with 3040 kg of thrust.

Photo: Robert Blaschke

 


Engine exhaust pipes were separated with the characteristic curved "double" tail (to the left of the photo) - a distinctive feature of Mig-19.
 

Photo: Robert Blaschke

 


A look into exhaust pipe of the starboard engine
 

Photo: Robert Blaschke

 


Perforated ventral air brake in half-open position - this due to lack of hydraulic pressure in 
the preserved aircraft.
 

Photo: Robert Blaschke

 


..and its complex internal detail. As can be seen the pressed metal formers on the inside provided for the smooth outer skin surface with brake in the closed position.

Photo: Robert Blaschke

 

This strange shape is a tail parachute attachment point.

Photo: Robert Blaschke

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